Author Topic: Pictures from around the Homestead  (Read 380 times)

sixball

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Pictures from around the Homestead
« on: December 08, 2020, 12:05:06 PM »
I posted some wildlife pictures on EDNY's "Chickadee" thread and though it best to start my own thread with pictures from around the place here and maybe a few other spots. They may include some of the house, shop, and junk piles. We bought this 80 acre place in 1972 when I was 27 and had built enough to move here by 1980. We'll stay as long as we can but it's not easy sometimes. Anyone else is welcome to post their similar pictures and thoughts.

First a couple I took of the place while deer hunting this year. One is from the canyon above the house looking down and across the valley. The other is from the ridge where some of the eagle pictures were taken.




The probability of life originating from accident is comparable to the probability of the unabridged dictionary resulting from an explosion in a printing shop.  Edwin Conklin

sixball

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2020, 12:25:01 AM »
Some of the smaller critters. There are at least two kinds of ground squirrels, pack rats, chip monks.
The probability of life originating from accident is comparable to the probability of the unabridged dictionary resulting from an explosion in a printing shop.  Edwin Conklin

EDNY

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2020, 07:23:05 AM »
Neat country out there...is it possible for soft wood like pine trees to survive in large numbers?  Just curious - when I bought this old farm back in the 90's it was previously a dairy farm with open pasture.  I began planting about 2000 various pines and spruce each Spring for few years.  Planted them in random groups of 6-8 hoping to draw in wildlife (deer), some of the trees are now 30' tall and the deer showed  up.

The trees have begun broadcasting on their own and misc trees are popping up everywhere.  Have also planted hard wood like black walnut, horse and (100%) American chestnuts. 
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sixball

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2020, 03:45:49 PM »
Ed, This area is a series of micro climates. Elevations change rapidly and Northern and Southern exposers change within feet because of the mountains. The snow stays much longer on the northern slopes and more plants grow there. Water is scarce. An old saying here is, "Whiskey is for drinking and water is for fighting over." It is as true now as in the old days. Nevada has twice as many water rights than it has water. In 1916 Nevada and Arizona almost went to war over the Colorado River. This whole area is in the rain shadow of the Sierras. Wet storms from the west are squeezed as they come up and over the Sierras. It works like wringing out a sponge. The dry sponge (clouds) continue west and actually draw up moisture and carry it away, to repeat the process at the next mountain range. I still like the east slope of the Sierras more that the more forested West slope.

That said almost anything will grow here if it's in the right spot and has water. We are able to live here because there are springs on the property. They are the reason this became private property in the 1800s. Nevada water laws are different from anywhere else in the country because of the mining that the state was built on. The minerals and the water were seldom found in the same place. Virginia City gets it's water through ah big syphon tube from neat Lake Tahoe. Before the mining most of the mountains around here were covered with Ponderosa pine and Douglas fir. There was also more Pinion pine and Mountain Juniper than there is now. The trees were striped from the mountains for mine timbers and firewood to fuel the big steam engines used for the mines and mills. Pinion and Juniper are what is growing here now. This deer season I saw for the first time a grove on Ponderosa in the mountain range behind my house that I had heard about almost 50 years. It is several miles away. Just a few miles away between Virginia City and Reno there are lots of Ponderosa and Doug fir.

Cottonwoods and willows grow where there is water along with lots of brushy plants. Fruit trees do well. I have tried to reintroduce some of the larger evergreens with no success yet. I think with the clear cutting in the mining days a lot of soil was lost from the mountain sides. Another problem we have is so many man caused fires and sone caused by lightning. Stupidity is the cause but invasive non-native plants are the fuel that drives them. Cheat grass brought fro Russia in hopes to improve grazing along with tumble weeds and fox tail. We have been very lucky but have had one right here and many around us.

The Pinions are great trees and make the best fire wood I have ever used and that includes Oak, Madrone, Almond, Eucalyptus , and more. It is very dangerous in wildfires because each tree is a wildfire waiting to happen. They have a high pitch content and have dead branches from ground to the top on the inside of the needle canopy. They make their own chimney. We call them gasoline trees. In Mexico they make lamp fuel from the pitch. They produce great pine nuts and are Nevada's state tree. The junipers called cedars in some places make great fence posts, an industry in the old days, and is a nice smelling wood to burn.
#1. A sign just over the hill from me where a fire started by stupid shooters burned for a few days. I got this years deer on the edge of that burn.
#2. What looks like a cloud is smoke from that fire.
#3. A hillside spring with several large cottonwoods.
#4. the road home
« Last Edit: December 09, 2020, 03:54:37 PM by sixball »
The probability of life originating from accident is comparable to the probability of the unabridged dictionary resulting from an explosion in a printing shop.  Edwin Conklin

EDNY

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2020, 04:07:58 PM »
Kinda reminds me of working in the desert near El Paso, TX and Anapra, NM.  Worked the entire southern border at some point over the years. Used to really enjoy the smell of the desert after a good rain....hard to describe but the desert even felt good to me after the rain.

You mention pitch...pitch pine is common up here, the pitch can be used as a survival food or a hot warm up survival tea.  You gotta be really lost to chew or drink it! :o  I bet it makes a good glue also...takes days to get it off your hands!
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sixball

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2020, 04:49:17 PM »
That is the problem of cutting it for firewood when green. I let it sit until the bark is falling off. Then the pitch has dried inside, it cuts well, and is clean to handle. I've got a big one down and ready to try my new chainsaw on.

 We are not like that desert but the rain is always welcome and the smell is wonderful. I put metal roofs on everything so we can enjoy the sound. It is a good fire guard too.

 My uncle told me his dad was a Border Patrolman in South Texas in the 30s. He was sometimes the only Anglo kid around. He spoke great Spanish and was a thought SOB! He taught me enough to get me through, barely. ::)
The probability of life originating from accident is comparable to the probability of the unabridged dictionary resulting from an explosion in a printing shop.  Edwin Conklin

chopper526

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2020, 10:12:46 AM »
You guys aren't too much older than me, but you have some cool stories and had some great experiences. Sixball, did you grow up out there? It seems to me that you are pretty much out in the wilderness, what made you choose there to settle down? How far is your closest neighbor?
Ed, you went from the extreme southern boarder to the extreme northern boarder. I've been in Philly my whole life and feel like I live in the country because I have 1/2 acre with 10 trees and am a half mile away from park/woods.
Tighten it up til it strips, then back it off a quarter turn

sixball

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2020, 02:18:25 PM »
I was conceived in Tulsa born in Southern California. My folks were building planes for Douglas during the war. When the Japanese found out I was born they surrendered and we moved back home to Texas. When I was 14 The family sold the land and we moved to California. My wife and I moved here to teach school and bought this place a year later. She is from an old California ranching family. We both wanted some space. The nearest neighbor in a mine about a mile away. The closest house is about 4 miles away. We have 2 miles of dirt road that I maintain a little. In the 4 miles from the highway we climb 2,000 feet in elevation most of that in the last mile. We have been snowed in several times for up to two weeks.

The land I grew up on in Texas was bought by my grandad from John Adair. He was English and owned the JA Ranch in the Texas panhandle. The famous Charlie Goodnight ran it. Charlie invented the chuck wagon for use on the long cattle drives. My grandad and his brother were cowboys on some of this drives from Texas to Kansas. He went from Texas to homestead in Oklahoma where my dad was born in 1913 and moved to the Texas ranch in 1917.  Yeah, I'm fairly Western and certainly stuck in another time and mindset. I've been all over the West but east of the Mississippi only twice and one of those was on a plane.
The probability of life originating from accident is comparable to the probability of the unabridged dictionary resulting from an explosion in a printing shop.  Edwin Conklin

sixball

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2020, 02:27:08 PM »
Some dead stuff.
#1. A big packrat.
#2. Some ground Squirrels
The probability of life originating from accident is comparable to the probability of the unabridged dictionary resulting from an explosion in a printing shop.  Edwin Conklin

62131

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2020, 05:58:50 PM »
You caught him stealing break fluid the little thief, is that a 22 or 17

sixball

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2020, 07:13:42 PM »
It is a 22 LR. It has a bull barrel, Hogue stock, a target tiger group and a lightened hammer. It is a tack driver. These things are DOA at about 75 yards and still in mortal danger a bit farther. Most of them get taken closer to 25 yards. Usually I sit on my shooting deck and let them show themselves. If I walk around looking for them I use a hand gun or a 22 rifle without a scope.

 That pack rat is more than twice as big as the one we usually deal with. My wife called it Ratzilla. I put the brake fluid there for scale. That is a large can. They are really cute but very destructive. They can chew through a wall in a night. They carry things away and piss on everything. They chew wiring and hoses and build big nests full of things they haul away. They can make a mess of a shop or vehicle in a hurry. They can wipe out a garden of flower bed in one night. They haul the vegetation to their nests. I have an ongoing string of traps set. Their fur is soft I guess I could make my wife a fur coat.  ::)
The probability of life originating from accident is comparable to the probability of the unabridged dictionary resulting from an explosion in a printing shop.  Edwin Conklin

chopper526

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2020, 12:10:15 PM »
Sixball, you have just explained to me why people who collect and keep a lot of junk are called "pack rats". ;)
Also, being so remote, you must get along with your wife very well....or she is very tolerant ::) ;D
Tighten it up til it strips, then back it off a quarter turn

62131

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2020, 05:03:43 PM »
Sixball, you have just explained to me why people who collect and keep a lot of junk are called "pack rats". ;)
Also, being so remote, you must get along with your wife very well....or she is very tolerant ::) ;D

No one else around to create any friction

sixball

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2020, 10:58:31 PM »
She is a treasure! We had or 51st anniversary in August and we went together for 5 years before that. She can shoot too!
The probability of life originating from accident is comparable to the probability of the unabridged dictionary resulting from an explosion in a printing shop.  Edwin Conklin

TFoch

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Re: Pictures from around the Homestead
« Reply #14 on: December 22, 2020, 05:16:14 PM »
Even though I live on the outskirts of the city there's a lot of wooded area around.  Had 3 deer cut across my lawn early yesterday morning and go behind my yard into the woods.  In the past we've had deer, a moose, a bear and a couple fisher cats cross through the yard.
Home schooling my grandkids gets in the way of finishing my car

 


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